Teen heart risk from COVID-19 far exceeds that of vaccination, study says

Teens have a far greater risk of heart inflammation from COVID-19 than from the vaccines that protect against it, new research shows.

“Comparative risk can complicate decisions for parents in such highly charged health debates,” said lead author Mendel Singer, vice chair for education at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in Cleveland.

“But our study shows that for parents concerned for their teens about myocarditis/pericarditis [heart inflammation], the safer choice is vaccination,” he said in a university news release.

Singer and his colleagues compared health records of 7,300 girls and 6,800 boys age 12-17 nationwide who were diagnosed

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Eating This Nut Once a Week Slashes Your Heart Disease Risk, Study Says

We all know we should be trying to fit more fruits and vegetables into our daily diet, but that’s easier said than done. Try as we might, eating certain foods every singly day doesn’t always pan out. But what about keeping up with a weekly habit? Not only is that significantly more manageable, but the health benefits may be just as enticing. One study found that eating a particular type of nut just once a week could substantially improve your heart health. Read on to find out which type of nut you should add to your diet to slash your

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Heart study: Low- and regular-dose aspirin safe, effective | Health And Fitness

An unusual study that had thousands of heart disease patients enroll themselves and track their health online as they took low- or regular-strength aspirin concludes that both doses seem equally safe and effective for preventing additional heart problems and strokes.

But there’s a big caveat: People had such a strong preference for the lower dose that it’s unclear if the results can establish that the treatments are truly equivalent, some independent experts said.

Half who were told to take the higher dose took the lower one instead or quit using aspirin altogether.

“Patients basically decided for themselves” what they wanted

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This Diet and Exercise Combo Is the Key to Long-Term Weight Loss, New Study Says

Worldwide, the prevalence of obesity has nearly tripled since 1975. Today, there are 650 million people who qualify as obese, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). Obesity can lead to serious health conditions, like heart disease and type 2 diabetes, and treating obesity—that is, losing weight and keeping it off—is not easy.

A new study published in the New England Journal of Medicine endeavored to find the most effective way to maintain healthy weight loss. In a randomized clinical trial, the researchers looked at 215 participants with obesity and found that the most effective way to lose and

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Hunter Food Study Special Report

Hours are flexible and these instructors may go part time or full time. Food brokers are often paid on fee, which means a company solely pays if the broker performs, but the revenue has no ceiling. They typically begin out as assistants or gross sales representatives to learn the ropes. Strong negotiation and communication skills are just the beginning, it takes strategy and planning to land giant commissions. Successful brokers know the gross sales numbers and margins they should hit and how much wiggle room they’ve in negotiations. They additionally track hours they need to make investments to make sure … Read More

Small study shows heart damage after COVID-19 uncommon in college athletes

college athletes
Credit: Pixabay/CC0 Public Domain

In a small study, researchers found college athletes who contracted COVID-19 rarely had cardiac complications. Most had mild COVID symptoms that did not require treatment, and in a small percentage of those with abnormal cardiac testing, there was no evidence of heart damage on special imaging tests. All athletes returned to sports without any health concerns, according to new research published today in the American Heart Association’s flagship journal Circulation.

In spring 2020, concerns about heart damage, especially inflammation, among athletes with COVID-19 led to recommendations for cardiac screening based on symptom severity before resuming

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