What heart and stroke patients should know about COVID-19 vaccine boosters

vaccine
Credit: Unsplash/CC0 Public Domain

COVID-19 vaccines offer protection against life-threatening disease caused by the coronavirus to people with heart disease and stroke, and a booster dose could bolster that protection, health experts said.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which sets policy on vaccine use, recommended Pfizer booster vaccines for several groups last week. People 65 and older; residents in long-term care settings; and people 50 and older with underlying medical conditions should receive a booster at least six months after their initial Pfizer vaccine doses, the CDC said.

People 18 to 49 with underlying medical conditions and adults

Read More

Heart disease affects Indians ahead of western counterparts, say doctors



Doctors and medical staff make a heart of rose petals and demonstrate CPR during a heart attack, on the occasion of World Heart Day at a hospital in Mumbai on Monday. (HT Photo)


© Provided by Hindustan Times
Doctors and medical staff make a heart of rose petals and demonstrate CPR during a heart attack, on the occasion of World Heart Day at a hospital in Mumbai on Monday. (HT Photo)

LUCKNOW Prevention and treatment services for cardiovascular diseases have been severely disrupted amid healthcare providers more focused on combating spread of vector-borne and Covid infections, said health experts.

“With the growing burden of heart failure in India, there is need to recognise it as a public health priority. However, another barrier to care that needs to be overcome is poor adherence to

Read More

Are you at risk? Simple stairs test could help detect the deadly condition

Heart disease: Doctor explains how to reduce risk

UP NEXT

UP NEXT

There are around 7.6 million people living with a heart or circulatory disease in the UK, according to the British Heart Foundation. A study has suggested that an assessment of your ability to walk up stairs could indicate whether you are at risk of the condition.

With the decline of smoking and widespread use of cholesterol-lowering drugs, changes in public health have significantly helped curb rates of heart disease. Nonetheless, it still directly impacts many people.

According to the World Health Organisation, heart disease remains the leading

Read More

Are boys at higher risk?

young boy who has just had his vaccine seen from behindShare on Pinterest
A non-peer-reviewed study has raised concerns about heart inflammation risk in young boys who take the COVID-19 vaccine. vejaa/Getty Images
  • A new, non-peer-reviewed study concluded that healthy boys aged 12–17 years had a higher hospitalization rate due to heart inflammation after their second mRNA COVID-19 vaccination than the expected hospitalization rate for COVID-19 in that age group.
  • A non-peer-reviewed study reports on scientific research that other experts in the field have not evaluated before publication; it should not guide clinical decision-making.
  • In the case of this paper, there are several issues with the data that the researchers
Read More

Use of smartphone app associated with lower hospital readmission rates for heart attack survivors

Study shows use of smartphone app associated with lower hospital readmission rates for heart attack survivors
MiCORE digital health intervention screenshots show application components, including medication tracking, vital signs monitoring, educational materials and scheduling follow-up appointments. Credit: Francoise Marvel and Seth Martin

Data collected from a group of 200 heart attack survivors using a smartphone app designed to navigate the recovery process, such as medication management and lifestyle changes, showed that app users experienced hospital readmission within the first 30 days of discharge at half the rate of a comparable group given standard aftercare without the app.

According to the American Heart Association, 1 in 6 patients who have been hospitalized after a heart attack return

Read More

This One Easy Thing Reduces Your Risk of Premature Death by 70 Percent

Experts have long said that one of the easiest things you can do to improve your overall health, reduce your risk of chronic disease, and get and keep your weight in a healthy range is to move more on a regular basis. The ideal amount of exercise is a bit trickier. 

Experts today recommend getting at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity activity a week to improve heart health and reduce the risk of chronic diseases like cancer, while noting that even more activity may be necessary for some goals like weight loss

But two provocative new studies

Read More