Heart health: The more exercise the better | Health

When it comes to matters of heart health, no amount of exercise is too much, scientists said in research that debunks the myth that high levels of vigorous physical activity might not always be beneficial.

The research found “every move counts” toward improving cardiovascular health, the scientists said, with the lowest risk for heart disease seen in people who exercised the most.

Cardiovascular disease is the world’s leading cause of death — killing almost 18 million people a year globally, according to the World Health Organization.

This research, which involved more than 90,000 people studied over a five-year period,

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How I revived my small business after being hospitalized at 34

  • Shannon Hennig is a small business owner and health and wellness marketing expert.
  • In September 2020, she was suddenly hospitalized with a diagnosis of congenital heart failure and had to take time off from running her business.
  • As she eased back into work, began health treatment, and continued homeschooling her young son, Hennig learned to set boundaries to safeguard her physical and mental health.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

In September 2020, I was diagnosed with congestive heart failure caused primarily by high blood pressure that was left untreated for too long. Despite leading a healthy lifestyle,

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‘Fat but fit’ is a myth when it comes to heart health, new study shows

Previous studies had suggested that being physically fit could mitigate the negative effects of being overweight on heart health, but this is not the case, according to a new study in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC), published Thursday.

“One cannot be ‘fat but healthy.’ This was the first nationwide analysis to show that being regularly active is not likely to eliminate the detrimental health effects of excess body fat,” said study author Alejandro Lucia, a professor of exercise physiology at the European University of Madrid.

“Our findings refute the … Read More

Baystate Health cardiovascular lectures go remote; opens with focus on COVID impact on heart

SPRINGFIELD — A talk on heart complications caused by coronavirus disease 2019 will lead off the popular annual Heart & Vascular Health Series being presented remotely this year at noon on the four Sundays in February by Baystate Health due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The series, held in conjunction with American Heart Month and given by Baystate providers, begins with the Feb. 7 talk, “The COVID Heart: Effects of COVID-19 on the Heart, What We Know,” by Dr. Aaron Kugelmass, Baystate’s vice president and medical director of heart and vascular services and chief of cardiology.

Increasingly, long-term complications,

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Phase 1B Coming In Next Few Days

OLYMPIA, WA — The next phase of Washington state’s vaccination program will be coming sooner than previously thought.

Washington State Secretary of Health Dr. Umair Shah announced Wednesday that he has ordered the state Department of Health to speed up vaccinations, with the goal of entering the next phase of vaccine distribution sometime in the next few days.

There has been mounting criticism over recent weeks of the country’s slow rollout of vaccinations. Shah says Washington is taking that criticism to heart.

“It has not been enough,” Shah said. “We’ve got to do better, and we are going to do

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Americans delaying needed healthcare due to COVID-19

Survey finds Americans may delay medical appointments, emergency care during pandemic
Exercise physiologist Nicholas Walker checks Will Fontaine’s blood pressure at his cardiac rehab session at the Orlando Health Heart & Vascular Institute. A new national survey by the Orlando Health Heart & Vascular Institute finds many Americans are hesitant to make and keep medical appointments when COVID-19 rates are high. Credit: Orlando Health Heart & Vascular Institute

A new national survey by the Orlando Health Heart & Vascular Institute finds many Americans would delay doctor’s appointments and even emergency care when COVID-19 rates are high. The survey found 67 percent of Americans are more concerned about going to medical appointments

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