What heart and stroke patients should know about COVID-19 vaccine boosters

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COVID-19 vaccines offer protection against life-threatening disease caused by the coronavirus to people with heart disease and stroke, and a booster dose could bolster that protection, health experts said.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which sets policy on vaccine use, recommended Pfizer booster vaccines for several groups last week. People 65 and older; residents in long-term care settings; and people 50 and older with underlying medical conditions should receive a booster at least six months after their initial Pfizer vaccine doses, the CDC said.

People 18 to 49 with underlying medical conditions and adults

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Most Americans believe pandemic remains a major threat to health, economy, poll says: Latest COVID-19 updates

More than a year and a half into the coronavirus outbreak, most Americans believe the coronavirus remains a major threat to public health and the U.S. economy, according to a Pew Research Center report released Wednesday.

Despite widespread vaccination efforts, 54% of U.S. adults say the worst of the outbreak is still to come. The report, based on a survey of 10,348 U.S. adults conducted Aug. 23-29, 2021, found 73% of those ages 18 and older say they’ve received at least one dose of a vaccine for COVID-19. About a quarter of adults say they have not received a vaccine.

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Teen heart risk from COVID-19 far exceeds that of vaccination, study says

Teens have a far greater risk of heart inflammation from COVID-19 than from the vaccines that protect against it, new research shows.

“Comparative risk can complicate decisions for parents in such highly charged health debates,” said lead author Mendel Singer, vice chair for education at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in Cleveland.

“But our study shows that for parents concerned for their teens about myocarditis/pericarditis [heart inflammation], the safer choice is vaccination,” he said in a university news release.

Singer and his colleagues compared health records of 7,300 girls and 6,800 boys age 12-17 nationwide who were diagnosed

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Young people are experiencing rare cases of heart inflammation after getting coronavirus vaccines, but doctors say the risk of COVID-19 is far greater

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Pfizer-BioNTech’s COVID-19 vaccine. Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

  • Young people who got COVID-19 vaccines have reported higher rates of heart inflammation.

  • The CDC is investigating whether there’s a link between the Pfizer and Moderna shots and these events.

  • Even if there is a link, doctors said, the risk from COVID-19 is far greater than from the vaccines.

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Young people who received the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna coronavirus vaccines have reported higher-than-usual rates of heart inflammation and swelling, US health officials said on Thursday.

The findings are preliminary and

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Small study shows heart damage after COVID-19 uncommon in college athletes

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In a small study, researchers found college athletes who contracted COVID-19 rarely had cardiac complications. Most had mild COVID symptoms that did not require treatment, and in a small percentage of those with abnormal cardiac testing, there was no evidence of heart damage on special imaging tests. All athletes returned to sports without any health concerns, according to new research published today in the American Heart Association’s flagship journal Circulation.

In spring 2020, concerns about heart damage, especially inflammation, among athletes with COVID-19 led to recommendations for cardiac screening based on symptom severity before resuming

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Mild COVID-19 infection is very unlikely to cause lasting heart damage

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Mild Covid-19 infection is very unlikely to cause lasting damage to the structure or function of the heart, according to a study led by UCL (University College London) researchers and funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) and Barts Charity.

The researchers say the results, published in JACC Cardiovascular Imaging, should reassure the public, as they relate to the vast majority of people who had Covid-19 infections with mild or no symptoms.

This study of 149 healthcare workers recruited from Barts Health and Royal Free London NHS Trusts is the largest and most detailed study to

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