The 6 Signs of Poor Gut Health and What to Do About It

Gut health has been such an important topic, especially in recent years. And while much research still needs to be done on the subject, generally, we know it’s important to have a healthy gut. But when you get down to the nitty-gritty of the topic, like “good” and “bad” bacteria, prebiotics, and probiotics, it can be downright confusing, especially when you’re not a gastroenterologist, scientist, or dietitian.

If you’re still a bit fuzzy on gut health, we’re here to help. We talked to experts to get some more insight into the subject, how you can improve your gut

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Rates of ‘broken heart syndrome’ are way up during the coronavirus pandemic, a study found

FILE - In this April 20, 2020, file photo, resident physician Leslie Bottrell stands outside a room at an Intensive Care Unit as a nurse suctions the lungs of a COVID-19 patient at St. Joseph's Hospital in Yonkers, N.Y. A U.S. government report says death rates are 12 times higher for coronavirus patients with chronic illnesses than for others who become infected. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report Monday, June 15 highlights the dangers posed by these conditions. They include heart disease, diabetes and chronic lung ailments, such as asthma or emphysema. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)
FILE – In this April 20, 2020, file photo, resident physician Leslie Bottrell stands outside a room at an Intensive Care Unit as a nurse suctions the lungs of a COVID-19 patient at St. Joseph’s Hospital in Yonkers, N.Y. A U.S. government report says death rates are 12 times higher for coronavirus patients with chronic illnesses than for others who become infected. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report Monday, June 15 highlights the dangers posed by these conditions. They include heart disease, diabetes and chronic lung ailments, such as asthma or emphysema. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)

Associated Press

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Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the US — here’s how to prevent and treat the condition

Heart disease is a dangerous condition, but it can be prevented with routine doctor’s visits and lifestyle changes.

Terry Vine/Getty Images

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), about 647,000 Americans die from heart disease a year — a total of one in every four deaths — making it the leading cause of death in the US.

Heart disease encompasses a range of heart health problems. For example, you may know someone who has had a heart attack, but this is just one of many types of heart disease. Most of the time, heart disease

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Pregnant 26-year-old’s death sheds light on health care system that fails Black mothers

It was a day Sha-Asia Washington had looked forward to for the last nine months.

The Brooklyn mother-to-be posed for a photo from her bed at Woodhull Medical Center in New York on July 2. Her face mask was pulled down to her chin so the camera could capture her joyful smile.

Washington, 26, was a few days past her due date when went to the hospital for a routine stress test. After some observation, doctors noticed her blood pressure was high and gave Washington a drug to induce labor. She was asked if she wanted an epidural and after

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Heart attack victims missing vital treatment because of coronavirus fears

PORTSMOUTH, ENGLAND – MAY 05: An ambulance crew from the South Central Ambulance Service wear protective clothing as they complete the digital paperwork after responding to a false alarm call for a heart attack on May 05, 2020 in Portsmouth, England. Due to the risk of contamination to the air ambulance helicopters, patients have been transferred to the mainland using the hovercraft service since the beginning of May. As the list of recognised Covid-19 symptoms grows, paramedic crews like those with the South Central Ambulance Service are forced to treat every patient as being a potential case, often requiring specialised
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Hope fades for fall high school sports as health wisdom prevails over COVID-19 skeptics

Last month, I was certain high school sports would play out in California this fall, even if in an abbreviated form.

I wasn’t naive. I was hopeful, as were the sea of coaches, administrators, parents and student-athletes I regularly spoke to.

I was encouraged because flattening the coronavirus curve meant to shutter schools, to social distance, to mask up, to wash hands vigorously as if was performing surgery. Everyone doing their part.

I was optimistic because sports, the band, theater arts — anything extracurricular — are a vital part of a campus and a community, especially football, the identifying action

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